Mary Jo Hoffman’s STILL Lines Now at Target and West Elm

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STILL for Target

Back in November, we interviewed Shoreview photographer Mary Jo Hoffman about her evanescent STILL blog, “a daily portrait of the natural ephemera—rocks and flowers, seedpods and bird eggs, spiders and frogs—she finds on her walks and elsewhere. Shot on white paper, her images are simple and serene, and have garnered an avid following for their quiet aesthetic.”

If you’ve ever desired to immerse yourself in her world, now you can. Hoffman’s first line for Target, STILL by Mary Jo Hoffman, is now available. At last you can rest your head on a pillow printed with her birds’ nests, feathers, flowers, vines or thistles. Shower behind a curtain festooned with an arching branch of bleeding heart, a row of North Shore lake rocks, or a red-hot line of sumac leaves. Or nestle between sheets printed with Hoffman’s beloved blue jay feathers, bittersweet vines, birch trees, or lake reeds.

STILL by Mary Jo Hoffman features 33 images from her blog in eight color-themed collections of sheets, shams, pillowcases, duvet covers and shower curtains. Printed on 600-count cotton (luxurious and weighty), the items are minimalist yet serene. For those who have merely looked, it’s now possible to bring Hoffman’s singular sensibility—Scandinavian, clean, refreshing—into your home.

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STILL for West Elm

Hoffman has also created a collection of gold-framed acrylic wall hangings featuring 36 different STILL images for West Elm that are now available. STILL for West Elm includes Hoffman’s botanical arrays, insect wings, egg collections, and feathers arranged in shadow-box-like frames on white backgrounds that, Hoffman says, “cast elegant shadows on the wall behind them.”

In our interview, Hoffman said this about her work: “These days we’re so bombarded with stimuli. To slow down and just look at one thing, isolated on white, is very calming. The images are also orderly and orderliness is calming. For me, creating the images is meditation, a form of deep play.” Now we can play, too.

By Camille LeFevre
Photos via Mary Jo Hoffman

 

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